Grande Arm

Some articles on grande arm, arm:

La Grande Armée
... The Grande Armée (French for ″Great Army″ or ″Grand Army″) first entered the annals of history when, in 1805, Napoleon I renamed the army that he had assembled on the French coast of the English ... In practice, however, the term "Grande Armée" is used in English to refer to all of the multinational forces gathered by Napoleon I in his campaigns of the early 19th century (see Napoleonic Wars) ... The first Grande Armée consisted of six corps under the command of Napoleon's marshals and senior generals ...
Battle Of Vyazma - Background
... because this city was isolated deep in enemy territory, and was thus unsuitable as the Grande Armée's winter quarters ... campaigning, the retreat imposed on the Grande Armée extreme conditions of privation and attrition. 3, the day of the action at Vyazma, the retreating Grande Armée was stretched out in a column 60 miles (100 km) long ...
La Grande Armée - Forces of The Grande Armée - Imperial Marines
... The Marins (French spelling) of the Grande Armée were divided into the Bataillon des Marins de la Garde Impériale, also known eventually as the Matelots de la ... The marines were distinct in several ways from other Grande Armée units in that naval rather than Army ranks were used, the uniform was based on that ...
La Grande Armée - Ranks of The Grande Armée
... the Ancien Régime and other monarchies, advancement in the Grande Armée was based on proven ability rather than social class or wealth ... Grande Armée rank Modern U.S ...
Étienne Tardif De Pommeroux De Bordesoulle - Life - Cuirassiers
... Recalled to the armée d'Allemagne on 25 May 1809 to command a cavalry brigade in Masséna's 4th corps ... put in command of the 3rd light cavalry brigade of the armée d'Allemagne on 2 December ... That observation corps became a corps of the Grande Armée and so in June 1812 Bordesoulle was summoned to head that corps 2nd light cavalry brigade ...

Famous quotes containing the word arm:

    Man is but a reed, the feeblest one in nature; but he is a thinking reed. The entire universe need not arm itself to crush him—a vapor, a drop of water suffices to kill him. But if the universe were to crush him, man would still be nobler than that which killed him, because he knows that he dies and the advantage which the universe has over him; the universe knows nothing of this.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)