Gothic Language - Comparison To Other Germanic Languages

Comparison To Other Germanic Languages

For the most part, Gothic is known to be significantly closer to Proto-Germanic than any other Germanic language, except for that of the (scantily attested) early Norse runic inscriptions. This has made it invaluable in the reconstruction of Proto-Germanic. In fact, Gothic tends to serve as the primary foundation for reconstructing Proto-Germanic. The reconstructed Proto-Germanic conflicts with Gothic only when there is clearly identifiable evidence from other branches that the Gothic form is a secondary development.

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Other articles related to "comparison to other germanic languages, germanic languages, languages, germanic":

Gothic Language - Comparison To Other Germanic Languages - Classification
... The standard theory of the origin of the Germanic languages divides the languages into three groups East Germanic (Gothic and a few other very scantily attested languages), North Germanic (Old Norse and its ... The North Germanic and West Germanic languages are further grouped into the Northwest Germanic languages, indicating that Gothic was the first ... A minority opinion (the so-called Gotho-Nordic Hypothesis) instead groups North Germanic and East Germanic together ...

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