Gore Vidal

Gore Vidal

Eugene Luther Gore Vidal ( /ˌɡɔr vɨˈdɑːl/;, born Eugene Louis Vidal, October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) was an American writer known for his essays, novels, screenplays, and Broadway plays. He was also known for his patrician manner, Transatlantic accent, and witty aphorisms. Vidal came from a distinguished political lineage; his grandfather was the U.S. Senator Thomas Gore of Oklahoma.

Vidal was a lifelong Democrat; he ran for political office twice and was a longtime political commentator. As well known for his essays as his novels, Vidal wrote for The Nation, the New Yorker, the New York Review of Books and Esquire. Through his essays and media appearances, Vidal was a longtime critic of American foreign policy. In addition to this, he characterised the United States as a decaying empire from the 1980s onwards. He was also known for his well-publicized spats with such figures as Norman Mailer, William F. Buckley, Jr., and Truman Capote.

His most widely regarded social novel was Myra Breckinridge; his best known historical novels included Julian, Burr, and Lincoln. His third novel, The City and the Pillar (1948), outraged conservative critics as one of the first major American novels to feature unambiguous homosexuality. Vidal always rejected the terms of "homosexual" and "heterosexual" as inherently false, claiming that the vast majority of individuals had the potential to be pansexual. His screenwriting credits included the epic historical drama Ben-Hur (1959), into which he claimed he had written a "gay subplot." Ben-Hur won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

At the time of his death he was the last of a generation of American writers who had served during World War II, including J.D. Salinger, Kurt Vonnegut, Norman Mailer, and Joseph Heller. Perhaps best remembered for his caustic wit, he referred to himself as a "gentleman bitch" and has been described as the 20th century's answer to Oscar Wilde.

Read more about Gore VidalPersonal Life, Legacy

Other articles related to "gore vidal, vidal":

Politics In Fiction - Written Works
... Skinner Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell Dark Green, Bright Red (1950) by Gore Vidal The Outsider (1953) by Richard Wright The Quiet American (1955) by Graham Greene The Shark and the Sardines ... (1959) by Allen Drury The Best Man (1960) by Gore Vidal (play) Catch 22 (1961) by Joseph Heller The Golden Notebook (1962) by Doris Lessing Seven Days in May (1962) by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W ... (1967) by Gore Vidal The Godfather, by Mario Puzo (1969) Being There, by Jerzy Kosiński (1971) The Lorax (1971) by Dr ...
The Golden Age (Gore Vidal Novel) - Allusions/references To Actual History, Geography and Current Science
... American Chronicle series by Gore Vidal also known as Narratives of Empire Burr Lincoln 1876 Empire Hollywood Washington, D.C ... The Golden Age Gore Vidal Plays Visit to a Small Planet (1957) The Best Man (1960) Novels The City and the Pillar (1948) Julian (1964) Washington, D.C ... Live from Golgotha The Gospel according to Gore Vidal (1992) The Smithsonian Institution (1998) The Golden Age (2000) Screenplays The Catered Affair (1956 ...
Gore Vidal: The Man Who Said No
... Gore Vidal The Man Who Said No (1983) is a documentary film directed, produced, and edited by Gary Conklin ... American writer and political gadfly Gore Vidal in his quixotic campaign against incumbent California Governor Jerry Brown for the Democratic nomination for the United ...
William F. Buckley, Jr. - In The Political Firing Line - Feud With Gore Vidal
... Buckley appeared in a series of televised debates with Gore Vidal during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago ... Vidal responded that people were free to state their political views as they saw fit, whereupon Buckley interrupted and noted that people were free ... Vidal then interjected that "the only sort of pro- or crypto-Nazi I can think of is yourself", whereupon Smith interjected, "Now let's not call names." Buckley, visibly angered, rose ...
Gore Vidal - Bibliography - Media Appearances
... Mary Hartman (1976 — 7 episodes) — as himself Profile of a Writer Gore Vidal — RM Productions (1979 documentary film) Gore Vidal The Man Who Said No (1983 ... School headmaster (uncredited) The Education of Gore Vidal (2003) Documentary by Deborah Dickson, aired in the US on PBS Thinking XXX (2004 documentary ... David Dimbleby (November 04, 2008) "Writer Against the Grain" Gore Vidal in conversation with Jay Parini at the 2009 Key West Literary Seminar (audio, 5909) Real Time with Bill Maher (April 10, 2009) Shrink (2009 ...

Famous quotes by gore vidal:

    In America, the race goes to the loud, the solemn, the hustler. If you think you’re a great writer, you must say that you are.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)

    Each writer is born with a repertory company in his head. Shakespeare has perhaps 20 players, and Tennessee Williams has about 5, and Samuel Beckett one—and maybe a clone of that one. I have 10 or so, and that’s a lot. As you get older, you become more skillful at casting them.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)

    There is something about a bureaucrat that does not like a poem.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)

    The last best hope of earth, two trillion dollars in debt, is spinning out of control, and all we can do is stare at a flickering cathode-ray tube as Ollie ‘answers’ questions on TV while the press, resolutely irrelevant as ever, asks politicians if they have committed adultery. From V-J Day 1945 to this has been, my fellow countrymen, a perfect nightmare.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)

    Apparently, a democracy is a place where numerous elections are held at great cost without issues and with interchangeable candidates.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)