Gokongwei College of Engineering

The Gokongwei College of Engineering of De La Salle University is one of six colleges that comprise the University. It was established in 1947 with the aim of providing young men who are knowledgeable in science and technology to help rehabilitate the Philippines, which was then devastated in the aftermath of World War II.

At present the College aims to prepare young men and women to help in the industrialization and improvement of the economy of the Philippines. The College currently offers six Bachelor of Science (BS) degree programs: Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electronics and Communications Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering and Management, and Mechanical Engineering, as well as Doctor of Philosophy programs in Chemical Engineering, Electronics and Communications Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. It also offers Master of Science programs for its undergraduate BS degrees with the addition of Environmental Engineering and Management.

Through the College of Engineering, the university has been selected by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to be part of the Southeast Asian Engineering Education Network (SEED-Net), the only Philippine private university in the network.

The College is located at the Geronimo Velasco Hall, a building named after Geronimo Z. Velasco, who was a former President of the Philippine National Oil Company and Minister of Energy.

Read more about Gokongwei College Of Engineering:  Student Organizations, College Assembly/Government Presidents

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