Gocco

Gocco (プリントゴッコ, Purinto Gokko?, "Print Gocco") is a self-contained compact color printing system invented in 1977 by Noboru Hayama. Gocco became immensely popular in Japan and it is estimated that one-third of Japanese households own a Print Gocco system. The printing mechanism is that of screen printing. The Gocco sets included the materials and tools to both make the screens, and to use these screens for printing. As the Gocco screens are quite small, they were most widely used for printing greeting cards, a popular need within Japanese culture. Gocco could also print to fabrics, although only across a small area. The Gocco printing screens did offer good registration, so two or more colour printing was practical and popular.

The name "print gocco" is derived from the Japanese word gokko (ごっこ?), loosely translated as make-believe play. Riso Kagaku president Noboru Hayama explained, "We learned rules and knowledge through make-believe play. The spirit of play is an important cultural asset. I thought that I wanted to leave "play" in the product's name."

Read more about Gocco:  Printing Method, Decline

Other articles related to "gocco":

Gocco - Decline
... In December 2005, Gocco’s parent company, Riso Kagaku Corporation, announced it would end production of the Gocco system due to low sales in Japan ... resumed production of several lines of Print Gocco units and they were available in Japan and through limited import retail stores in the United States ... On May 30, 2008, the Riso Kagaku Corporation announced that it will stop shipping Gocco printers in June 2008 ...