Glock19 - Design Details - Feeding

Feeding

The Glock 17 feeds from staggered-column or double stack magazines that have a 17-round capacity (which can be extended to 19 with an optional floor plate) or optional 33-round high capacity magazines. For jurisdictions which restrict magazine capacity to 10 rounds, Glock offers single stack 10-round magazines. The magazines are made of steel and are overmolded with plastic. A steel spring drives a plastic follower. After the last cartridge has been fired, the slide remains open on the slide stop. The slide stop release lever is located on the left side of the frame directly beneath the slide and can be manipulated by the thumb of the shooting hand.

Glock magazines are "one-way" interchangeable between models, meaning that a compact or subcompact pistol will accept magazines designed for the larger pistols chambered for the same round. However, magazines designed for compact and subcompact models will not function in larger pistols because they are not tall enough to reach the slide and magazine release. For example, the subcompact Glock 26 will accept magazines from both the full-size Glock 17 and the compact Glock 19, but the Glock 17 will not accept magazines from the smaller Glock 19 or the Glock 26.

Read more about this topic:  Glock19, Design Details

Other articles related to "feeding":

Mark 8 - Feeding of The 4000 and The Healing of The Blind Man At Bethsaida
... See also Feeding the multitude and The Blind Man of Bethsaida Like Mark 630-44 Mark 8 describes Jesus feeding a large crowd with hardly any food at all ... Luke nor John have this, yet both record the preceding feeding of the 5000 ... Luke goes right from the feeding of the 5000 to Peter's confession in Luke 9 ...
Gleaning (birds)
... Gleaning is a term for a feeding strategy by birds in which they catch invertebrate prey, mainly arthropods, by plucking them from foliage or the ground ... Gleaning is a common feeding strategy for some groups of birds, including nuthatches, tits (including chickadees), wrens, woodcreepers, treecreepers, Old ... Many birds make use of multiple feeding strategies, depending on the availability of different sources of food and opportunities of the moment ...
Ctenophore - Description - Common Features - Feeding, Excretion and Respiration
... Little is known about how ctenophores get rid of waste products produced by the cells ... The ciliary rosettes in the gastrodermis may help to remove wastes from the mesoglea, and may also help to adjust the animal's buoyancy by pumping water into or out of the mesoglea ...
Mantled Howler - Behavior - Locomotion
... Most of the active period is spent feeding, with only about 4% of the day spent on social interaction ... tail to grasp a branch when sleeping, resting or when feeding ... A study has shown that the mantled howler reuses travel routes to known feeding and resting sites, and appears to remember and use particular landmarks to help ...
Barau's Petrel - Behaviour - Feeding
... The petrels are highly pelagic at sea, preying on small fish (10cm) by surface-seizing and plunge diving ... They will associate with other species while feeding ...

Famous quotes containing the word feeding:

    When all who had money and leisure
    Grew rural o’er ices and wines,
    All pleasantly toiling for pleasure,
    All hungrily pining for pines,
    And making of beautiful speeches,
    And marring of beautiful shows,
    And feeding on delicate peaches,
    And treading on delicate toes.
    Winthrop Mackworth Praed (1802–1839)

    I am still a learner, not a teacher, feeding somewhat omnivorously, browsing both stalk and leaves; but I shall perhaps be enabled to speak with more precision and authority by and by,—if philosophy and sentiment are not buried under a multitude of details.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Man may have his opinion as to the relative importance of feeding his body and nourishing his soul, but he is allowed by Nature to have no opinion whatever as to the need for feeding the body before the soul can think of anything but the body’s hunger.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)