Georgian Army

Some articles on georgian army, georgian:

Joint Control Commission For Georgian–Ossetian Conflict Resolution - Joined Peacekeeping Force (JPKF) in The 2008 South Ossetia War
... August 7, the Georgian army began a massive artillery bombardment on the city of Tskhinvali, starting the Battle of Tskhinvali, the first major battle of the ... ex-minister of defense of Georgia, Georgian servicemen of the JPKF were ordered by the Georgian command to leave their posts on August 7, at 300 p.m ... This was one hour before the Georgian army received an order to move to the borders of South Ossetia ...
2008 South Ossetia War - Active Stage - Bombing and Occupation of Gori
... Main article Occupation of Gori Gori is a major Georgian city close to the administrative boundary of the region of South Ossetia, about 25 km (16 mi) from Tskhinvali ... The Georgian Army used Gori as its staging area during the Battle of Tskhinvali, and the Russian Air Force bombed the city several times ... Georgian artillery units were also stationed near Gori ...
2008 South Ossetia War - Aftermath - Russian Withdrawal
... Civilian refugees returned, and the military base was re-occupied by the Georgian Army ... On 23 August, Russian forces withdrew from Igoeti, and were replaced by Georgian police ... A Georgian police officer was shot and killed several hundred meters from a Russian checkpoint in Karaleti, twelve miles from South Ossetia ...
2008 South Ossetia War - Combatants - Equipment Losses and Cost
... The Georgian Army lost 150 pieces of military equipment, much of it left behind during the Georgian Army's retreat from Gori and Poti ... The Georgian Army also lost 1,728 small arms during the conflict ... Three Georgian Navy vessels out of the 19 vessel-strong force were sunk in their harbour, Poti, after Russian forces occupied the city, while the rest of the Georgian Navy escaped to Batumi, and a Georgian ...

Famous quotes containing the word army:

    Private property is held sacred in all good governments, and particularly in our own. Yet shall the fear of invading it prevent a general from marching his army over a cornfield or burning a house which protects the enemy? A thousand other instances might be cited to show that laws must sometimes be silent when necessity speaks.
    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)