George Street Bridge

George Street Bridge may refer to:

Other articles related to "street, streets, bridge":

Omsk - Cityscape
... is an ensemble of buildings along Lyubinsky Avenue/Lenina Street, anchored by the former Gostiny Dvor, and flanked by two chapels ... Another area of interest is Nikolsky Avenue/Krasnykh Zor Street, where a line of merchants' wooden houses still stands ... The street leads to the Neoclassical cathedral of St ...
23rd Street (Manhattan)
23rd Street is a broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan ... It is one of few two-way streets in the gridiron of the borough ... As with Manhattan's other "crosstown" streets, it is divided at Fifth Avenue, in this case at Madison Square Park, into its east and west sections ...
Zhima Jie - Books
... Sesame Street School Readiness (11 titles) Sesame Street Thinking Child (6 titles) Sesame Street Learning Environment (4 titles) ...
Uxbridge - Transport
... in 1933, is fronted by a pedestrian high street and is connected to a bus terminus with connections to Hillingdon, Hayes, Ealing, Ruislip, and Slough ... There were once two overground railway stations - Uxbridge Vine Street (originally just Uxbridge Station) and Uxbridge High Street ... Both were planned to be linked, hence High Street ending on a half built bridge ...

Famous quotes containing the words bridge and/or street:

    A circle swoop, and a quick parabola under the bridge arches
    Where light pushes through;
    A sudden turning upon itself of a thing in the air.
    A dip to the water.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    During the Suffragette revolt of 1913 I ... [urged] that what was needed was not the vote, but a constitutional amendment enacting that all representative bodies shall consist of women and men in equal numbers, whether elected or nominated or coopted or registered or picked up in the street like a coroner’s jury. In the case of elected bodies the only way of effecting this is by the Coupled Vote. The representative unit must not be a man or a woman but a man and a woman.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)