Geography of Ohio

Geography Of Ohio

Ohio (i/oʊˈhaɪ.oʊ/) is a state in the Midwestern United States. Ohio is the 34th most extensive, the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

The name "Ohio" originated from Iroquois word ohi-yo’, meaning "great river" or "large creek". The state, originally partitioned from the Northwest Territory, was admitted to the Union as the 17th state (and the first under the Northwest Ordinance) on March 1, 1803. Although there are conflicting narratives regarding the origin of the nickname, Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" (relating to the Ohio buckeye tree) and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes".

The government of Ohio is composed of the executive branch, led by the Governor; the legislative branch, which comprises the Ohio General Assembly; and the judicial branch, which is led by the Supreme Court. Currently, Ohio occupies 16 seats in the United States House of Representatives. Ohio is known for its status as both a swing state and a bellwether in national elections.

Read more about Geography Of Ohio:  Geography, Major Cities, Demographics, Economy, Transportation, Education, State Symbols

Other articles related to "geography of ohio, of ohio, ohio":

Outline Of Ohio - Geography of Ohio - Regions of Ohio - Administrative Divisions of Ohio
... The 88 counties of the state of Ohio Municipalities in Ohio Cities in Ohio State capital of Ohio Columbus City nicknames in Ohio Sister cities in Ohio Villages in Ohio Unincorporated communities in ...
Geography Of Ohio - State Symbols
... Main article List of Ohio state symbols See also Lists of U.S ... state insignia Ohio's state symbols State animal White-tailed Deer (1987) State beverage Tomato juice (1965) State bird Cardinal (1933) State capital Columbus (1816) State flower Red carnation (1904) State fossil ...

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    Where the heart is, there the muses, there the gods sojourn, and not in any geography of fame. Massachusetts, Connecticut River, and Boston Bay, you think paltry places, and the ear loves names of foreign and classic topography. But here we are; and, if we tarry a little, we may come to learn that here is best. See to it, only, that thyself is here;—and art and nature, hope and fate, friends, angels, and the Supreme Being, shall not absent from the chamber where thou sittest.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    All inquiry into antiquity, all curiosity respecting the Pyramids, the excavated cities, Stonehenge, the Ohio Circles, Mexico, Memphis,—is the desire to do away this wild, savage, and preposterous There and Then, and introduce in its place the Here and Now.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Ktaadn, near which we were to pass the next day, is said to mean “Highest Land.” So much geography is there in their names.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)