Gas Air Mixture

Some articles on air, gas, mixture:

8 Flight Army Air Corps
8 Flight Army Air Corps is one of the Independent Flights within the British Army's Army Air Corps. 8 Flight is attached to the Special Air Service and based alongside them in Hereford ...
97th Air Mobility Wing
... The 97th Air Mobility Wing (97 AMW) is a United States Air Force unit assigned to the Air Education and Training Command Nineteenth Air Force ... It is stationed at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma ... was a component organization of Strategic Air Command's deterrent force during the Cold War, as a strategic bombardment wing ...
Lean Burn - Heavy-duty Gas Engines
... Lean burn concepts are often used for the design of heavy-duty natural gas, biogas, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuelled engines ... These engines can either be full-time lean burn, where the engine runs with a weak air-fuel mixture regardless of load and engine speed, or part-time ... Heavy-duty lean burn gas engines admit twice as much air than theoretically needed for complete combustion into the combustion chambers ...
800 Naval Air Squadron
800 Naval Air Squadron was a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm carrier based squadron formed on 3 April 1933 by amalgamating No's 402 and 404 (Fleet Fighter) Flights ...

Famous quotes containing the words mixture, gas and/or air:

    Envy among other ingredients has a mixture of the love of justice in it. We are more angry at undeserved than at deserved good-fortune.
    William Hazlitt (1778–1830)

    one pale woman all alone,
    The daylight kissing her wan hair,
    Loitered beneath the gas lamps’ flare,
    With lips of flame and heart of stone.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    The Laws of Nature are just, but terrible. There is no weak mercy in them. Cause and consequence are inseparable and inevitable. The elements have no forbearance. The fire burns, the water drowns, the air consumes, the earth buries. And perhaps it would be well for our race if the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Man were as inevitable as the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Nature—were Man as unerring in his judgments as Nature.
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882)