Garrison Forest School - Technology

Technology

Garrison Forest School has a 1:1 Tablet PC program for grades 4–12. The campus is fully wired, and classroom technology includes a mounted wireless projector in each classroom. Faculty members also use Tablet PCs to sync with students’ Tablets and to provide interactive learning in the classroom. In addition, each division (the Upper School, Middle School, and Lower Division) has its own Media Center with iMac computers, scanners, and color printers. The school offers a Robotics program for grades 4-12, and teams compete at the local and state levels.

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