Garrison - British and Irish Garrison

British and Irish Garrison

In the United Kingdom, "Garrison" also specifically refers to any of the major military stations such as Aldershot, Catterick, Colchester, Tidworth, Bulford, and London, which have more than one barracks or camp and their own military headquarters, usually commanded by a Colonel, Brigadier or Major-General, assisted by a Garrison Sergeant Major. In Ireland, Association football (as distinct from Gaelic football) has historically been termed the "garrison game" or the "garrison sport" for its connections with British military serving in Irish cities and towns.

Read more about this topic:  Garrison

Other articles related to "irish":

Ireland - Culture - Food and Drink
... Main article Irish cuisine Food and cuisine in Ireland takes its influence from the crops grown and animals farmed in the island's temperate climate and from the social and political circumstances ... the arrival of the potato in the 16th century the dominant feature of the Irish economy was the herding of cattle, the number of cattle a person owned was equated to their social standing ... unsophistication to cooking, such as the Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, boxty, a type of potato pancake, or colcannon, a dish of mashed potatoes and kale or cabbage ...

Famous quotes containing the words garrison, british and/or irish:

    Our country is the world—our countrymen are all mankind.
    —William Lloyd Garrison (1805–1879)

    If the British prose style is Churchillian, America is the tobacco auctioneer, the barker; Runyon, Lardner, W.W., the traveling salesman who can sell the world the Brooklyn Bridge every day, can put anything over on you and convince you that tomatoes grow at the South Pole.
    Ishmael Reed (b. 1938)

    The Irish are the only men who know how to cry for the dirty polluted blood of all the world.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)