Gare Loch

The Gare Loch or Gareloch (Gaelic: An Gearr Loch) is a sea loch in Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

Read more about Gare Loch:  Geography

Other articles related to "gare loch, loch, lochs":

HMNB Clyde - Faslane Naval Base
... See also Nuclear weapons and the United Kingdom Faslane Naval Base, situated on the Gare Loch, and the RN Armaments Depot Coulport on Loch Long, are the primary components of HMNB Clyde ... Both the Gare Loch and Loch Long are sea lochs extending northwards from the Firth of Clyde ... on the relatively secluded but deep and easily navigable Gare Loch and Firth of Clyde on the west coast of Scotland ...
Rosneath
... It sits on the western shore of the Gare Loch near to the tip of the Rosneath peninsula which projects south to the Firth of Clyde between the Gare Loch and Loch Long to the west, and about 2 miles (3 km) from the ... The Gare Loch narrows at Rosneath to under half a mile (around 600 metres) at a place known as the Rhu Narrows after the village of Rhu on the eastern shore of the loch ...
Gare Loch - Geography
... A sea loch aligned north-south, Gare Loch is 10 kilometres long with an average width of 1.5 kilometres ... to the whole body of land separating the Gare Loch from Loch Long to the west ... The loch was the site of a major naval base during World War II and was used to store decommissioned naval vessels in the 1950s ...

Famous quotes containing the words loch and/or gare:

    Oh, many a day have I made good ale in the glen,
    That came not of stream, or malt, like the brewing of men;
    My bed was the ground, my roof the greenwood above,
    And the wealth that I sought, one far kind glance from my love.
    —Unknown. The Outlaw of Loch Lene (l. 1–4)

    ... no other railroad station in the world manages so mysteriously to cloak with compassion the anguish of departure and the dubious ecstasies of return and arrival. Any waiting room in the world is filled with all this, and I have sat in many of them and accepted it, and I know from deliberate acquaintance that the whole human experience is more bearable at the Gare de Lyon in Paris than anywhere else.
    M.F.K. Fisher (1908–1992)