Frock Coat

A frock coat is a man's coat characterised by knee-length skirts all around the base, popular during the Victorian and Edwardian periods. The double-breasted style is sometimes called a Prince Albert (after the consort to Queen Victoria). The frock coat is a fitted, long-sleeved coat with a centre vent at the back, and some features unusual in post-Victorian dress. These include the reverse collar and lapels, where the outer edge of the lapel is cut from a separate piece of cloth to the main body, and also a high degree of waist suppression, where the coat's diameter round the waist is much less than round the chest. This is achieved by a high horizontal waist seam with side bodies, which are extra panels of fabric above the waist used to pull in the naturally cylindrical drape.

The frock coat was widely worn in much the same situations as modern lounge suits and formalwear, with different variations. One example is that a frock coat for formalwear was always double-breasted with peaked lapels; as informal wear, the single-breasted frock coat often sported the step, or notched, lapel (the cause of its informality), and was more common in the early nineteenth century than the formal model.

Dress coats and morning coats, the other main knee-length coats of the period, shared the waist seam of frock coats, making them all body coats, but differed in the cut of the skirt, as the frock coat does not have the cut away front which gives dress coats and morning coats tails at the back. As was usual with all coats in the nineteenth century, shoulder padding (called 'American shoulders') was rare or minimal. The formal frock coat only buttons down to the waist seam, which is decorated at the back with a pair of buttons. The frock coat that buttoned up to the neck, forming a high, stand-up collar, was worn only by clergymen.

Read more about Frock CoatHistory

Other articles related to "frock, coat, frock coat, coats":

Frocking
... who has been selected for promotion may be authorized to "frock" to the next grade ... The need to frock is a result of the fact that the number of people who may serve in a particular rank is restricted by federal law ... United States Army a general officer may request authority to frock soldiers of his command in the United States Air Force, only senior field grade and general officers ...
History Of Suits - Men's Suits - Victorian
... of the 19th century, a new (then informal) coat, the morning coat, became acceptable ... Morning dress and the frock coat garments were not suits, because they were worn with trousers that didn't match in color or fabric a matching waistcoat and trousers were considered informal, clothes ... The frock coat was still the standard garment for all formal or business occasions, and a tailcoat was worn in the evenings ...
Frock Coat - Modern Use - Teddy Boys
... The Teddy Boys, a 1950s UK youth movement, named for their use of Edwardian-inspired clothing, briefly revived the frock coat, which they often referred to as a "drape.". ...
Morning Dress - History
... riding a horse in the morning with a cutaway front single breasted morning coat ... it gradually became acceptable to wear it in more formal situations instead of a frock coat ... In the Edwardian era it took over in popularity from the frock coat as the standard daytime form of men's full dress ...
Uniform Of The Union Army - Description - Variations
... A rifle green coat was issued to Berdan's Sharpshooters, 1st and 2nd Sharpshooter Regiment as an early form of camouflage ... The number of buttons on these coats varied between 12 and 8 ... Later in the war soldiers of all branches were issued loose-fitting blue sack coats with 4 brass buttons, based on the civilian work jacket, which remained in service ...

Famous quotes containing the word coat:

    I can sit up half the night
    With some friend that has the wit
    Not to allow his looks to tell
    When I am unintelligible.
    Fifteen apparitions have I seen;
    The worst a coat upon a coat-hanger.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)