Forensic Scientists - Examples in Popular Culture

Examples in Popular Culture

Sherlock Holmes, the fictional character created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in works produced from 1887 to 1915, used forensic science as one of his investigating methods. Conan Doyle credited the inspiration for Holmes on his teacher at the medical school of the University of Edinburgh, the gifted surgeon and forensic detective Joseph Bell. Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple books and television series were also a big hit worldwide.

Decades later the comic strip Dick Tracy also featured a detective using a considerable number of forensic methods, although sometimes the methods were more fanciful than actually possible.

Barry Allen (alter ego of The Flash) is a forensic scientist for the Central City police department.

Defence attorney Perry Mason occasionally used forensic techniques, both in the novels and television series.

One of the earliest television series to focus on the scientific analysis of evidence was Quincy, M.E. (1976–83, and based loosely on an even earlier Canadian series titled Wojeck), with the title character, a medical examiner working in Los Angeles solving crimes through careful study. The opening theme of each episode featured a clip of the title character, played by Jack Klugman, beginning a lecture to a group of police officers with "Gentlemen, you are about to enter the most fascinating sphere of police work, the world of forensic medicine." Later series with similar premises include Dexter, The Mentalist, CSI,"" Cold Case, Bones, Law & Order, Body of Proof, NCIS, Criminal Minds, Silent Witness, Case Closed, Midsomer Murders and Waking the Dead, depict glamorized versions of the activities of 21st-century forensic scientists. Some claim these TV shows have changed individuals' expectations of forensic science, an influence termed the "CSI effect".

Non-fiction TV shows such as Forensic Files, The New Detectives, American Justice, and Dayle Hinman's Body of Evidence have also popularized forensic science.

The Ace Attorney series features forensic science, mainly in Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney and the DS-only case in Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney.

Read more about this topic:  Forensic Scientists

Other articles related to "popular, examples in popular culture, popular culture":

History Of Belgium - Interwar Period - Art and Culture
... Comic strips became extremely popular in Belgium during the 1930s ... One of the most popular comics of the 20th century, Hergé's The Adventures of Tintin first appeared in 1929 ... The growth of comic strips was also accompanied by a popular art movement, exemplified by Edgar P ...
Julia (given Name)
... It was the 10th most popular name for girls born in the United States in 2007 and the 88th most popular name for females in the 1990 census there ... It was the 89th most popular name for girls born in England and Wales in 2007 the 94th most popular name for girls born in Scotland in 2007 the 13th most ...
Criminalist - Examples in Popular Culture
... Decades later the comic strip Dick Tracy also featured a detective using a considerable number of forensic methods, although sometimes the methods were more fanciful than actually possible ... Barry Allen (alter ego of The Flash) is a forensic scientist for the Central City police department. ...
Forensic Entomology - In Literature
... Early twentieth-century popular scientific literature began to pique a broader interest in entomology ... The very popular ten-volume book series, Alfred Brehem’s Thierleben (Life of Animals, 1876–1879) expounded on many zoological topics, including ... entomology became an established part of Western popular culture, which in turn inspired other scientists to continue and expand upon his research ...
Wadden Sea - Recreation
... Many of the islands have been popular seaside resorts since the 19th century ... walking on the sandy flats at low tide, has become popular in the Wadden Sea ... It is also a popular region for pleasure boating ...

Famous quotes containing the words popular culture, culture, examples and/or popular:

    Like other secret lovers, many speak mockingly about popular culture to conceal their passion for it.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    Everyone in our culture wants to win a prize. Perhaps that is the grand lesson we have taken with us from kindergarten in the age of perversions of Dewey-style education: everyone gets a ribbon, and praise becomes a meaningless narcotic to soothe egoistic distemper.
    Gerald Early (b. 1952)

    There are many examples of women that have excelled in learning, and even in war, but this is no reason we should bring ‘em all up to Latin and Greek or else military discipline, instead of needle-work and housewifry.
    Bernard Mandeville (1670–1733)

    Lawyers are necessary in a community. Some of you ... take a different view; but as I am a member of that legal profession, or was at one time, and have only lost standing in it to become a politician, I still retain the pride of the profession. And I still insist that it is the law and the lawyer that make popular government under a written constitution and written statutes possible.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)