Forelimbs

Some articles on forelimbs, forelimb:

Mantellisaurus
... Its forelimbs were proportionally shorter than those of I ... In Mantellisaurus the forelimbs were about half the length of the hindlimbs whereas they were about 70 percent the length of the hindlimbs in I ... Due to the short length of its forelimbs and the shortness of its body, Paul proposed that it was primarily bipedal, only going on all fours when standing still or moving ...
Hand Walking - In Non-human Animals
... Some quadrupeds are able to walk bipedally on their forelimbs, thus performing "hand" walking in an anthropomorphic sense ... For example, when attacked, the spotted skunk may rear up on its forelimbs so that its anal glands, capable of spraying an offensive oil, are directed towards the attacker ... Dogs can also be trained to walk on their forelimbs ...
Ichthyostega - Adaptations For Land Life
... the animal possessed a stronger skeletal structure, a more rigid spine, and forelimbs apparently powerful enough to pull the body from the water ... The hindlimbs were smaller than the forelimbs and unlikely to have borne full weight in an adult, while the broad, overlapping ribs would have inhibited side-to-side ... The forelimbs had the required range of movement to push the body up and forward, probably allowing the animal to drag itself across flat land by synchronous (rather than alternate) "c ...
Acrocanthosaurus - Paleobiology - Forelimb Function
... Like those of most other non-avian theropods, Acrocanthosaurus forelimbs did not make contact with the ground and were not used for locomotion instead they served a predatory function ... The discovery of a complete forelimb (NCSM 14345) allowed the first analysis of the function and range of motion of the forelimb in Acrocanthosaurus ... findings, the study suggested that, in a resting position, the forelimbs would have hung from the shoulders with the humerus angled backwards slightly, the ...
Postosuchus - Description - Postcranial Anatomy
... With the forelimbs being approximately 64% of the hindlimbs, Postosuchus had small hands bearing five toes ... Only the first toe bore a large claw, which was used as an offensive weapon, and the forelimbs were robust, probably to hold the prey. 2008, argued that the thick pectoral girdle served for locomotion of the forelimbs ...