Foreign Relations of Australia

The foreign relations of Australia have spanned from the country's time as Dominion and later Realm of the Commonwealth to become steadfastly allied with New Zealand through long-standing ANZAC ties dating back to the early 1900s, and the United States throughout the Cold War, to its engagement with Asia as a power in its own right. Its relations with the international community are influenced by its position as a leading trading nation and as a significant donor of humanitarian aid.

Australia's foreign policy is guided by a commitment to multilateralism and regionalism, as well as to strong bilateral relations with its allies. Key concerns include free trade, terrorism, economic cooperation with Asia and stability in the Asia-Pacific. Australia is active in the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Nations.

Read more about Foreign Relations Of AustraliaHistory, International Agencies, Treaties, and Agreements, Trade, Foreign Missions, Oceania, Southeast and East Asia, Americas, Europe, South Asia and Western Asia, Africa, International Disputes

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Foreign Relations Of Australia - International Disputes
... Australia has a number of ongoing international disputes ... Australia's role in the 2003 Invasion of Iraq without UN sanction has been a cause of protest ... Presently, there is tension in Australia's relations with Indonesia over the release of Abu Bakar Bashir as well as Australia's recent decision to grant temporary protection visas to 42 West Papuans, after which ...

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