Ford Mustang Variants - Third Party Modifications - Roush

Roush

Jack Roush Performance Engineering, established by former Ford engineer Jack Roush in 1976, had been known for providing performance racing parts, vehicles and engines. In 1995, Roush Performance Products was formed offering aftermarket performance parts, vehicles and crate engines for street use. The company introduced three packages for the Mustang. Stage 1 came with 17-inch (430 mm) wheels, a lowered suspension and a side-mounted exhaust system. In addition, it came with an air dam, side skirts and a rear spoiler. Stage 2 was an upgraded Stage 1 with 18-inch (460 mm) alloy wheels and BFGoodrich Comp T/A Tires. The suspension was extensively modified with Bilstein shocks, High-rate springs, stiffer anti-roll bars and new control arms. Roush claimed it achieved 1.0g lateral acceleration and was on par with the Porsche 911 Turbo. Both Stage 1 and Stage 2 came with V6 or V8 engine options. The top of the line was the Stage 3, with 360 hp (268 kW) and 375 ft·lbf (508 Nm) of torque. The Stage 3 platform was essentially a heavily modified Mustang GT. The Ford 4.6 L V8 was upgraded with an Eaton supercharger, a new intake manifold, high performing fuel injectors, an air-to-water intercooler and a lighter flywheel (on the manual transmission only). The Stage 3 was available in three packages: Sport, Rally and Premium.

In 2004, Roush released a limited edition mustang known as the 440A. This was a Stage 3 Roush with the addition of custom 440A interior, Roush braking system, and a rear exhaust system instead of the side-mounted exhaust system. The 440A model was released in 2004 to commemorate the 40 years of Ford Mustang production. Only 40 Roush 440A Mustangs were produced and all were sold at a dealership in Florida, USA. Roush also claimed that this model produced 400 hp (300 kW), a claim that has been argued by some who claim that the engine was dyno tested at 360 hp (268 kW).

In 2005, based on the S-197 Mustang, Roush introduced the Sport, Stage 1, and Stage 2 editions. In 2006, the "Stage 3" edition was introduced. In 2007 the 427R edition was introduced, and in 2008 the 428R was introduced. The Sport package was the Roush base model, and came with a body kit and high-performance exhaust systems. The Stage 1 came with 18-inch (460 mm) chrome wheels and aggressive tires, a high-performance exhaust system, a body kit, and a vast option menu of visual upgrades. The Stage 2 enhanced the Stage 1 by upgrading the stock suspension with high-performance front struts, rear shocks, front and rear springs, front and rear sway bars, and Pinion snubbers. The Stage 3 came with 18-inch (460 mm), forged chrome wheels and high-performance tires, and 14-inch (360 mm) rotors with four-piston Stop-Tech produced calipers, in addition to numerous "Stage 3" plaques, custom embroidered leather upholstery, and a custom dash instrument cluster. The blown 4.6 L V8 now had the output of 415 hp (268.4 kW) and 385 ft·lb (521 Nm) with a Roush supercharger and an air-to-water intercooler. The top of the line was the Stage 3 Mustang, but Roush recognized that many buyers did not want all the features (particularly cosmetic) that the Stage 3 offered, so they introduced the 427R. The 427R featured the same suspension, power-train, and most of the body-kit of the Stage 3, but it lacked the rear fascia and rectangular exhaust tips of the Stage 1-3 models. It produced an additional 20 horsepower (14.91 kW) and 15 ft·lbf (20 N·m) of torque over the Stage 3 Mustang, due to an upgraded ECM (Electronic Control Module). In addition, it was equipped with an "hockey stripe" appearance package in lieu of the two racing stripes found on the Sport through Stage 3 models. IN 2008, Roush produced the 428R Mustang, which was the same concept as the previous year's 427R. Big brakes were an option on both cars. Also, in 2007 and 2008, Roush produced 100 per year of the P-51A and P-51B mustangs. These cars featured a silver / green paint scheme (in a tribute to the P-51 Mustang fighter plane of WW-II)and the engine internals were upgraded to a forged rotating assembly allowing a larger Eaton TVS R2300 Roots supercharger to be used. This produced 510 crank horsepower. The difference between the A and B models is the belt drive for the supercharger - the A series uses a single belt, the B series uses a dual-belt system Front-End Accessory Drive (FEAD). Other Roush cars produced in this era were the Roush Trak-Pak and Drag-Pak Mustangs, and various one-offs for Cooper Tires and certain dealers of Roush products.

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