Flywheel Energy Storage

Flywheel energy storage (FES) works by accelerating a rotor (flywheel) to a very high speed and maintaining the energy in the system as rotational energy. When energy is extracted from the system, the flywheel's rotational speed is reduced as a consequence of the principle of conservation of energy; adding energy to the system correspondingly results in an increase in the speed of the flywheel.

Most FES systems use electricity to accelerate and decelerate the flywheel, but devices that directly use mechanical energy are being developed.

Advanced FES systems have rotors made of high strength carbon filaments, suspended by magnetic bearings, and spinning at speeds from 20,000 to over 50,000 rpm in a vacuum enclosure. Such flywheels can come up to speed in a matter of minutes — much quicker than some other forms of energy storage.

Read more about Flywheel Energy Storage:  Main Components, Advantages and Disadvantages

Other articles related to "flywheel energy storage, flywheels, flywheel":

Flywheel Energy Storage - Advantages and Disadvantages
... Flywheels are not as adversely affected by temperature changes, can operate at a much wider temperature range, and are not subject to many of the common failures of chemical rechargeable batteries ... which operate for a finite period of roughly 36 months, a flywheel can potentially have an indefinite working lifespan ... Flywheels built as part of James Watt steam engines have been continuously working for more than two hundred years ...

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