Fluid Mechanics - Relationship To Continuum Mechanics

Relationship To Continuum Mechanics

Fluid mechanics is a subdiscipline of continuum mechanics, as illustrated in the following table.

Continuum mechanics
Solid mechanics
Elasticity
Plasticity
Rheology
Fluid mechanics
Non-Newtonian fluids do not undergo strain rates proportional to the applied shear stress.
Newtonian fluids undergo strain rates proportional to the applied shear stress.

In a mechanical view, a fluid is a substance that does not support shear stress; that is why a fluid at rest has the shape of its containing vessel. A fluid at rest has no shear stress.

Read more about this topic:  Fluid Mechanics

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Solid Mechanics - Relationship To Continuum Mechanics
... As shown in the following table, solid mechanics inhabits a central place within continuum mechanics ... The field of rheology presents an overlap between solid and fluid mechanics ... Continuum mechanics Solid mechanics Elasticity Plasticity Rheology Fluid mechanics Non-Newtonian fluids do not undergo strain rates proportional to the ...

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