Flash (photography)

Flash (photography)

A flash is a device used in photography producing a flash of artificial light (typically 1/1000 to 1/200 of a second) at a color temperature of about 5500 K to help illuminate a scene. A major purpose of a flash is to illuminate a dark scene. Other uses are capturing quickly moving objects or changing the quality of light. Flash refers either to the flash of light itself or to the electronic flash unit discharging the light. Most current flash units are electronic, having evolved from single-use flashbulbs and flammable powders. Modern cameras often activate flash units automatically.

Flash units are commonly built directly into a camera. Some cameras allow separate flash units to be mounted via a standardized "accessory mount" bracket (hot shoe). In professional studio equipment, flashes may be large, standalone units, or studio strobes, powered by special battery packs or connected to mains power. They are either synchronized with the camera using a flash synchronization cable or radio signal, or are light-triggered, meaning that only one flash unit needs to be synchronized with the camera, and in turn triggers the other units.

Read more about Flash (photography):  Technique, Drawbacks

Other articles related to "flash":

Flash (photography) - Drawbacks
... Using on-camera flashwill give a very harsh light, which results in a loss of shadows in the image, because the only lightsource is in practically the same place as ... Balancing the flashpower and ambient lighting or using off-camera flashcan help overcome these issues ... Using an umbrella or softbox (the flashwill have to be off-camera for this) makes softer shadows ...

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