Finnish Orthodox Church

The Finnish Orthodox Church (Finnish: Suomen ortodoksinen kirkko; Swedish: Finska Ortodoxa Kyrkan) is an autonomous Orthodox archdiocese of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. The Church has a legal position as a national church in the country, along with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland.

With its roots in the medieval Novgorodian missionary work in Karelia, the Finnish Orthodox Church was a part of the Russian Orthodox Church until 1923. Today the church has three dioceses and 58,000 members that account for 1.1 percent of the population of Finland. The parish of Helsinki has the most adherents.

Read more about Finnish Orthodox ChurchStructure and Organization, Monasteries, Additional Organizations, Festivals, Church Architecture, History, Russian Orthodox Church in Finland, List of Archbishops

Other articles related to "finnish orthodox church, orthodox church, church, finnish":

Valaam Monastery - History
... In 1917, Finland became independent, and the Finnish Orthodox Church became autonomous under the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, as previously it had been a part of the Russian ... Valaam (Valamo) was the most important monastery of the Finnish Orthodox Church ... The liturgic language was changed from Church Slavonic to Finnish, and the liturgic calendar from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar ...

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