Fictional Planets of The Solar System

Fictional Planets Of The Solar System

The fictional portrayal of our Solar System has often included planets, moons, and other celestial objects which do not actually exist in reality. Some of these objects were, at one time, seriously considered as hypothetical planets which were either thought to have been observed, or were hypothesized in order to explain certain celestial phenomena. Often such objects continued to be used in literature long after the hypotheses upon which they were based had been abandoned.

Other non-existent Solar System objects used in fiction have been proposed or hypothesized by persons with no scientific standing, while yet others are purely fictional and were never intended as serious hypotheses about the structure of the Solar System.

Read more about Fictional Planets Of The Solar SystemVulcan, Counter-Earth, Phaëton, Trans-Neptunian Planets, Elsewhere in The Solar System, Rogue Planets

Other articles related to "fictional planets of the solar system, planet, planets, the solar system":

Fictional Planets Of The Solar System - Rogue Planets
... Main article Rogue planet Rogue planets in fiction usually originate outside the solar system, but their erratic paths lead them to within detectable range of Earth ... In reality, no rogue planet has ever been detected transiting the Solar System ... When Worlds Collide (1933), novel by Philip Wylie and Edwin Balmer Extrasolar planets Bronson Alpha and Bronson Beta enter the Solar System Bronson ...

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