Female Sexual Arousal Disorder

Female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD), commonly referred to as frigidity, is a disorder characterized by a persistent or recurrent inability to attain sexual arousal or to maintain arousal until the completion of a sexual activity. The diagnosis can also refer to an inadequate lubrication-swelling response normally present during arousal and sexual activity. The condition should be distinguished from a general loss of interest in sexual activity and from other sexual dysfunctions, such as the orgasmic disorder (anorgasmia) and hypoactive sexual desire disorder, which is characterized as a lack or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity for some period of time.

Although female sexual dysfunction is currently a contested diagnostic, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to promote products to treat FSD, often involving low doses of testosterone.

Read more about Female Sexual Arousal Disorder:  Subtypes, Diagnostic Features, Causes, Treatment, Criticism

Other articles related to "female sexual arousal disorder, disorder, sexual":

Female Sexual Arousal Disorder - Criticism
... One of the largest criticisms for female sexual arousal disorder is whether it is an actual disorder or an idea put forth by pharmaceutical companies ... The only mention of female sexual arousal disorder in a peer-reviewed medical journal indicated that 43% of women suffer from FSD, however the survey turned out to not be a rigorous study ... Another criticism, for example, "the meaningful benefits of experimental drugs for women's sexual difficulties are questionable, and the financial conflicts of ...

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