Failure - Criteria For Failure

Criteria For Failure

The criteria for failure are heavily dependent on context of use, and may be relative to a particular observer or belief system. A situation considered to be a failure by one might be considered a success by another, particularly in cases of direct competition or a zero-sum game. Similarly, the degree of success or failure in a situation may be differently viewed by distinct observers or participants, such that a situation that one considers to be a failure, another might consider to be a success, a qualified success or a neutral situation.

It may also be difficult or impossible to ascertain whether a situation meets criteria for failure or success due to ambiguous or ill-defined definition of those criteria. Finding useful and effective criteria, or heuristics, to judge the success or failure of a situation may itself be a significant task.

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Other articles related to "criteria for failure, failure":

Failed - Criteria For Failure
... The criteria for failure are heavily dependent on context of use, and may be relative to a particular observer or belief system ... A situation considered to be a failure by one might be considered a success by another, particularly in cases of direct competition or a zero-sum game ... Similarly, the degree of success or failure in a situation may be differently viewed by distinct observers or participants, such that a situation that one considers to be a failure ...

Famous quotes containing the words failure and/or criteria:

    There is no loneliness greater than the loneliness of a failure. The failure is a stranger in his own house.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)

    There are ... two minimum conditions necessary and sufficient for the existence of a legal system. On the one hand those rules of behavior which are valid according to the system’s ultimate criteria of validity must be generally obeyed, and on the other hand, its rules of recognition specifying the criteria of legal validity and its rules of change and adjudication must be effectively accepted as common public standards of official behavior by its officials.
    —H.L.A. (Herbert Lionel Adolphus)