External Combustion

Some articles on combustion, external, external combustion:

Pyrophone - Related Musical Instruments
... is similar to the steam calliope, but the difference is that in the calliope the combustion is external to the resonant cavity, whereas the pyrophone is an internal combustion instrument ... The difference initially seems insignificant, but external combustion is what gives the calliope its staccatto ... Operating under the constant pressures of an external combustion chamber, the calliope merely directs exhaust ...
Gas Turbine - External Combustion
... Most gas turbines are internal combustion engines but it is also possible to manufacture an external combustion gas turbine which is, effectively, a turbine version of a hot air engine ... External combustion has been used for the purpose of using pulverized coal or finely ground biomass (such as sawdust) as a fuel ... a heat exchanger is used and only clean air with no combustion products travels through the power turbine ...
Heat Engine - Combustion Engine - External Combustion Engine
... An external combustion engine (EC engine) is a heat engine where an internal working fluid is heated by combustion of an external source, through the engine wall or a heat exchanger ... "Combustion" refers to burning fuel with an oxidizer, to supply the heat ... such as nuclear, solar, geothermal or exothermic reactions not involving combustion but are not then strictly classed as external combustion engines, but ...

Famous quotes containing the words combustion and/or external:

    Him the Almighty Power
    Hurld headlong flaming from th’ Ethereal Skie
    With hideous ruine and combustion down
    To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
    In Adamantine Chains and penal Fire,
    Who durst defie th’ Omnipotent to Arms.
    Nine times the Space that measures Day and Night
    To mortal men, he with his horrid crew
    Lay vanquisht, rowling in the fiery Gulfe
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    No real “vital” character in fiction is altogether a conscious construction of the author. On the contrary, it may be a sort of parasitic growth upon the author’s personality, developing by internal necessity as much as by external addition.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)