Eutrophication

Eutrophication (Greek: eutrophia—healthy, adequate nutrition, development; German: Eutrophie) or more precisely hypertrophication, is the ecosystem response to the addition of artificial or natural substances, such as nitrates and phosphates, through fertilizers or sewage, to an aquatic system. One example is the "bloom" or great increase of phytoplankton in a water body as a response to increased levels of nutrients. Negative environmental effects include hypoxia, the depletion of oxygen in the water, which induces reductions in specific fish and other animal populations. Other species (such as Nomura's jellyfish in Japanese waters) may experience an increase in population that negatively affects other species.

Read more about Eutrophication:  Lakes and Rivers, Ocean Waters, Terrestrial Ecosystems, Ecological Effects, Sources of High Nutrient Runoff, Prevention and Reversal, Cultural Eutrophication

Other articles related to "eutrophication":

Cultural Eutrophication
... Cultural eutrophication is the process that speeds up natural eutrophication because of human activity ... Cultural eutrophication is a form of water pollution ... Cultural eutrophication also occurs when excessive fertilizers run into lakes and rivers ...
Phosphorus Cycle - Human Interference
... Natural eutrophication is a process by which lakes gradually age and become more productive and may take thousands of years to progress ... Cultural or anthropogenic eutrophication, however, is water pollution caused by excessive plant nutrients, which results in excessive growth in algae population ... erosion from high-P soils may be major contributing factors to fresh water eutrophication ...
Fertilizer - Negative Environmental Effects - Water Quality - Eutrophication
... If eutrophication can be reversed, it may take decades before the accumulated nitrates in groundwater can be broken down by natural processes ...
Rodeo Lagoon - Eutrophication
... The population of phytoplankton described above is extremely high in the summer, a condition known as eutrophication ... At times, the algae form a visible surface scum, and their high concentration results in large swings in the dissolved oxygen content of the water, culminating in a depletion of oxygen when the population finally crashes ...