Ethernet Hub

An Ethernet hub, active hub, network hub, repeater hub, multiport repeater or hub is a device for connecting multiple Ethernet devices together and making them act as a single network segment. It has multiple input/output (I/O) ports, in which a signal introduced at the input of any port appears at the output of every port except the original incoming. A hub works at the physical layer (layer 1) of the OSI model. The device is a form of multiport repeater. Repeater hubs also participate in collision detection, forwarding a jam signal to all ports if it detects a collision.

Some hubs may also come with a BNC and/or Attachment Unit Interface (AUI) connector to allow connection to legacy 10BASE2 or 10BASE5 network segments. The availability of low-priced network switches has largely rendered hubs obsolete but they are still seen in 20th century installations and more specialized applications.

Read more about Ethernet HubTechnical Information, Dual-speed Hub, Uses

Other articles related to "ethernet, hub, ethernet hub, hubs":

Cisco 2500 Series - Models Available
... Fixed Configuration Routers Model Ethernet AUI Token Ring Serial (Sync) ISDN BRI Serial (Async) Hub Notes 1. 10Mbit/s - 2 - - - Multiprotocol Router 2502 - 1 2 ...
Ethernet Hub - Uses
... Historically, the main reason for purchasing hubs rather than switches was their price ... This motivator has largely been eliminated by reductions in the price of switches, but hubs can still be useful in special circumstances For inserting a ... This can be prevented by using a hub, where a loop will break other users on the hub, but not the rest of the network ...

Famous quotes containing the word hub:

    We recognize caste in dogs because we rank ourselves by the familiar dog system, a ladderlike social arrangement wherein one individual outranks all others, the next outranks all but the first, and so on down the hierarchy. But the cat system is more like a wheel, with a high-ranking cat at the hub and the others arranged around the rim, all reluctantly acknowledging the superiority of the despot but not necessarily measuring themselves against one another.
    —Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. “Strong and Sensitive Cats,” Atlantic Monthly (July 1994)