Equity and Gender Feminism

Equity And Gender Feminism

Equity feminism and gender feminism are terms coined by scholar Christina Hoff Sommers in her 1992 book Who Stole Feminism?, which she uses to distinguish between what she describes as two ideologically distinct branches of modern feminism. Sommers is herself a strong advocate of what she calls equity feminism, and opposed to what she calls gender feminism. Since the publication of her book, the terminology has become widespread in feminist literature, even if not all agree with her advocacy of the equity model.

Read more about Equity And Gender Feminism:  Equity Feminism, Gender Feminism, Spread of Terminology

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Equity And Gender Feminism - Spread of Terminology
... has adopted the terminology of Sommers in its article on Liberal Feminism as has Victor Conde's A handbook of international human rights terminology and the Routledge ... Both these reference works have a single article on "equity vs ... gender feminism", though Routledge refers to the latter as "difference feminism" ...

Famous quotes containing the words equity and, feminism, equity and/or gender:

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