Epstein–Barr Virus

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), also called human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4), is a virus of the herpes family, and is one of the most common viruses in humans.

It is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). It is also associated with particular forms of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and central nervous system lymphomas associated with HIV. There is evidence that infection with the virus is associated with a higher risk of certain autoimmune diseases, especially dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and multiple sclerosis.

Infection with EBV occurs by the oral transfer of saliva.

Most people become infected with EBV and gain adaptive immunity. In the United States, about half of all five-year-old children and 90 to 95 percent of adults have evidence of previous infection. Infants become susceptible to EBV as soon as maternal antibody protection disappears. Many children become infected with EBV, and these infections usually cause no symptoms or are indistinguishable from the other mild, brief illnesses of childhood. In the United States and other developed countries, many people are not infected with EBV in their childhood years. When infection with EBV occurs during adolescence or teenage years, it causes infectious mononucleosis 35 to 50 percent of the time.

EBV infects B cells of the immune system and epithelial cells. Once the virus's initial lytic infection is brought under control, EBV latently persists in the individual's B cells for the rest of the individual's life.

Read more about Epstein–Barr VirusRole in Disease, History, Research

Other articles related to "virus":

History Of Virology - 20th Century - Epstein–Barr Virus
... Achong (1928–1996), and after many failures, discovered viruses that resembled herpes virus in the fluid that surrounded the cells ... The virus was later shown to be a previously unrecognised herpes virus, which is now called Epstein–Barr virus ... Surprisingly, Epstein–Barr virus is a very common but relatively mild infection of Europeans ...
Epstein–Barr Virus - Research
... A relatively complex virus, EBV is not yet fully understood ... Laboratories around the world continue to study the virus and develop new ways to treat the diseases it causes ... Epstein–Barr virus and its sister virus KSHV can be maintained and manipulated in the laboratory in continual latency ...

Famous quotes containing the word virus:

    [If a woman athlete who had contracted the AIDS virus admitted that she] had been with one hundred or two hundred men, they’d call her a slut, and the corporations would drop her like a lead balloon.
    Martina Navratilova (b. 1956)