Ends and Means

Ends and Means (an Enquiry Into the Nature of Ideals and Into the Methods Employed for Their Realization) is a book of essays written by Aldous Huxley. It was published in 1937. The book contains illuminating tracts on war, religion, nationalism and ethics, and was cited as a major influence on Thomas Merton in his autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain.

Works by Aldous Huxley
Novels
  • Crome Yellow (1921)
  • Antic Hay (1923)
  • Those Barren Leaves (1925)
  • Point Counter Point (1928)
  • Brave New World (1932)
  • Eyeless in Gaza (1936)
  • After Many a Summer (1939)
  • Time Must Have a Stop (1944)
  • Ape and Essence (1948)
  • The Genius and the Goddess (1955)
  • Island (1962)
Short stories
  • "Happily Ever After"
  • "Eupompus Gave Splendour to Art by Numbers"
  • "Cynthia"
  • "The Bookshop"
  • "The Death of Lully"
  • "Sir Hercules"
  • "The Gioconda Smile"
  • "The Tillotson Banquet"
  • "Green Tunnels"
  • "Nuns at Luncheon"
  • "Little Mexican"
  • "Hubert and Minnie"
  • "Fard"
  • "The Portrait"
  • "Young Archimedes"
  • "Half Holiday"
  • "The Monocle"
  • "Fairy Godmother"
  • "Chawdron"
  • "The Rest Cure"
  • "The Claxtons"
  • "After the Fireworks"
  • "Jacob's Hands: A Fable" (published 1997) co-written with Christopher Isherwood
Short story collections
  • Limbo (1920)
  • Mortal Coils (1922)
  • Little Mexican (US title: Young Archimedes) (1924)
  • Two or Three Graces (1926)
  • Brief Candles (1930)
  • Collected Short Stories (1957)
Poetry
  • The Burning Wheel (1916)
  • Jonah (1917)
  • The Defeat of Youth (1918)
  • Leda (1920)
  • Arabia Infelix (1929)
  • The Cicadias and Other Poems (1931)
  • Collected Poetry (1971)
Travel writing
  • Along the Road (1925)
  • Jesting Pilate (1926)
  • Beyond the Mexique Bay (1934)
Essay collections
  • On the Margin (1923)
  • Essays New and Old (1926)
  • Proper Studies (1927)
  • Do What You Will (1929)
  • Vulgarity in Literature (1930)
  • Music at Night (1931)
  • Texts and Pretexts (1932)
  • The Olive Tree (1936)
  • Ends and Means (1937)
  • Words and their Meanings (1940)
  • Science, Liberty and Peace (1946)
  • Themes and Variations (1950)
  • The Doors of Perception (1954)
  • Adonis and the Alphabet (US title: Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow) (1956)
  • Heaven and Hell (1956)
  • Collected Essays (1958)
  • Brave New World Revisited (1958)
  • Literature and Science (1963)
  • The Human Situation: 1959 Lectures at Santa Barbara (1977)
  • Moksha: Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (1999)
Screenplays
  • Pride and Prejudice (1940)
  • Madame Curie (uncredited, 1943)
  • Jane Eyre (1944)
  • A Woman's Vengeance (1947)
  • Prelude to Fame (1950)
  • Alice in Wonderland (uncredited, 1951)
Non-fiction
  • The Perennial Philosophy (1945) Grey Eminence (1941)
  • The Devils of Loudun (1952)
Plays
  • The Discovery (based on Frances Sheridan) (1924)
  • The World of Light (1931)
  • The Gioconda Smile (play version, also known as Mortal Coils) (1948)
  • The Genius and the Goddess (play version, with Betty Wendel) (1957)
  • The Ambassador of Captripedia (1965)
  • Now More Than Ever (1997)
Children's books
  • The Crows of Pearblossom (1944, published 1967)
  • The Travails and Tribulations of Geoffrey Peacock (1967)
Other books
  • The Art of Seeing (1942)
  • Selected Letters (2007)

Famous quotes containing the words ends and, means and/or ends:

    “... You’re searching, Joe,
    For things that don’t exist; I mean beginnings.
    Ends and beginnings there are no such things.
    There are only middles.”
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    ... though it is by no means requisite that the American women should emulate the men in the pursuit of the whale, the felling of the forest, or the shooting of wild turkeys, they might, with advantage, be taught in early youth to excel in the race, to hit a mark, to swim, and in short to use every exercise which could impart vigor to their frames and independence to their minds.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    The three great ends which a statesman ought to propose to himself in the government of a nation, are,—1. Security to possessors; 2. Facility to acquirers; and, 3. Hope to all.
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)