Emotions A Traders Worst Enemy Get Rid of Fear and Greed - Youll Be Glad You Did

Famous quotes containing the words emotions a, greed, glad, fear, emotions, worst, enemy and/or rid:

    Excellence or virtue is a settled disposition of the mind that determines our choice of actions and emotions and consists essentially in observing the mean relative to us ... a mean between two vices, that which depends on excess and that which depends on defect.
    Aristotle (384–323 B.C.)

    To-day ... when material prosperity and well earned ease and luxury are assured facts from a national standpoint, woman’s work and woman’s influence are needed as never before; needed to bring a heart power into this money getting, dollar-worshipping civilization; needed to bring a moral force into the utilitarian motives and interests of the time; needed to stand for God and Home and Native Land versus gain and greed and grasping selfishness.
    Anna Julia Cooper (1859–1964)

    Not for me the glad tidings of forthcoming salvation; everything is lost and I so want to live.
    Ester Wajcblum (1924–1945)

    I stand in awe of my body, this matter to which I am bound has become so strange to me. I fear not spirits, ghosts, of which I am one,—that my body might,—but I fear bodies, I tremble to meet them. What is this Titan that has possession of me? Talk of mysteries! Think of our life in nature,—daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it,—rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks! the solid earth! the actual world! the common sense! Contact! Contact! Who are we? where are we?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Insults from an adolescent daughter are more painful, because they are seen as coming not from a child who lashes out impulsively, who has moments of intense anger and of negative feelings which are not integrated into that large body of responses, impressions and emotions we call ‘our feelings for someone,’ but instead they are coming from someone who is seen to know what she does.
    Terri Apter (20th century)

    It was remarkable how easily he got along over the worst ground.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    These semi-traitors [Union generals who were not hostile to slavery] must be watched.—Let us be careful who become army leaders in the reorganized army at the end of this Rebellion. The man who thinks that the perpetuity of slavery is essential to the existence of the Union, is unfit to be trusted. The deadliest enemy the Union has is slavery—in fact, its only enemy.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    No common-place is ever effectually got rid of, except by essentially emptying one’s self of it into a book; for once trapped in a book, then the book can be put into the fire, and all will be well. But they are not always put into the fire; and this accounts for the vast majority of miserable books over those of positive merit.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)