Elizabethton Covered Bridge

The Elizabethton Covered Bridge is a 134-foot (41 m) covered bridge over the Doe River in Elizabethton, the county seat of Carter County, Tennessee.

The Elizabethton Covered Bridge was constructed in 1882 and connects 3rd Street and Hattie Avenue.

Read more about Elizabethton Covered BridgeFeatures, June Covered Bridge Festival, Parades, Connection With U.S. Interstate Highway System

Other articles related to "elizabethton covered bridge, bridges, elizabethton, covered bridge":

Doe River - Hydrography - Elizabethton - Elizabethton Covered Bridge
... Highway 19-E, the Doe River flows underneath two 19-E bridges at the East Side community before heading in a northwest angle toward the Elizabethton downtown business ... The Elizabethton Covered Bridge is located in downtown Elizabethton, the county seat of Carter County ... Connecting 3rd Street and Hattie Avenue, the historic 1882 covered bridge spans the Doe River is adjacent to a significant city city park and county government ...
Elizabethton, Tennessee - Demographics - Water Resources and Renewable Energy - Doe River
... State Route 67 and then underneath the historic Elizabethton Covered Bridge, built in 1882 and located within the Elizabethton downtown business district ... Connecting 3rd Street and Hattie Avenue, the covered bridge is adjacent to a city park and spans the Doe River ... The covered bridge, although now closed to motor traffic, is still open for bicycles and pedestrians ...
Elizabethton Covered Bridge - Connection With U.S. Interstate Highway System
... Interstate 26 Exit 24 at Johnson City then east US 321/Tennessee State Route 67 to Elizabethton, then straight on Elk Avenue to downtown business district ...

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