Elevators

Some articles on elevators, elevator:

Parrish & Heimbecker - History
... grain on the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, but was not operating grain elevators ... In 1918, P H bought 10 elevators from Louis Strong and Frederick Dowler, who were Calgary grain brokers ... After buying more elevators, by 1920, P H had 20 elevators ...
Halifax Provincial Court (Spring Garden Road) - Elevators
... Courtroom #2 featured an elevator that could ferry prisoners directly into the courtroom from the cells below, but it was removed in the 1930s after is malfunctioned ... could go ahead, they had a difficult time to get the elevator released and the prisoner freed from his unpleasant situation ...
Parrish & Heimbecker - Network of Canadian Grain Elevators and Terminals
... In 2011, P H have approximately 32 grain elevators in Canada including 12 grain elevators in Ontario that handle a variety of Canadian agricultural products such as wheat, corn, barley ...
Seattle Municipal Tower - Design
... The elevators are divided into lower and upper tiers ... In order to reach floors above 40, visitors must take an elevator to the "sky lobby" on 40 and transfer to a second elevator to continue upward ... Also, to reach floor 62 or "The Tip", one must transfer to a private elevator at floor 61 using an encoded badge ...
Canadian Grain Elevator Discovery Centre - History
... In 2001 the last of Nanton’s grain elevator row was threatened by demolition because of recent abandonment of the Canadian Pacific Railway that the elevators stood next to ... one effort was to do just that, save one, but before anything could be done to save the elevator the Society had to gain full title to the land and buildings ... and citizens, the Society was so successful that not only did they end up saving just one elevator, but all three remaining elevators ...

Famous quotes containing the word elevators:

    The cigar-box which the European calls a “lift” needs but to be compared with our elevators to be appreciated. The lift stops to reflect between floors. That is all right in a hearse, but not in elevators. The American elevator acts like the man’s patent purge—it works
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)