Electroacoustic Phenomena

Electroacoustic phenomena arise when ultrasound propagates through a fluid containing ions. The associated particle motion generates electric signals because ions have electric charge. This coupling between ultrasound and electric field is called electroacoustic phenomena. Fluid might be a simple Newtonian liquid, or complex heterogeneous dispersion, emulsion or even a porous body. There are several different electroacoustic effects depending on the nature of the fluid.

  • Ion Vibration Current/Potential (IVI), an electric signal that arises when an acoustic wave propagates through a homogeneous fluid.
  • Streaming Vibration Current/Potential (SVI), an electric signal that arises when an acoustic wave propagates through a porous body in which the pores are filled with fluid.
  • Colloid Vibration Current /Potential (CVI), an electric signal that arises when ultrasound propagates through a heterogeneous fluid, such as a dispersion or emulsion.
  • Electric Sonic Amplitude (ESA), the inverse of CVI effect, in which an acoustic field arises when an electric field propagates through a heterogeneous fluids.

Read more about Electroacoustic Phenomena:  Ion Vibration Current, Streaming Vibration Current, Double Layer Compression, Colloid Vibration Potential / Current, ElectricSonic Amplitude, Theory of CVI and ESA

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