Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall - Death

Death

In July 1297 Edmund was granted licence to make a will, his poor health is mentioned in a summons of December 1298, and by 1300 he was terminally ill. The date Edmund died is unknown, but was before 25 September 1300 when Edward I commanded celebration of exequies for the late earl, the following day the royal escheators were ordered to take hold of Edmund's estates. Edmund's heart and flesh were buried at Ashridge, attended by the king's son Edward, and on 23 March 1301 his bones were placed in Hailes Abbey, attended by the king in person. Leaving no children, Edmund's entire estate passed to the crown, excepting a dower for his widow.

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