Eclecticism

Eclecticism is a conceptual approach that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions, but instead draws upon multiple theories, styles, or ideas to gain complementary insights into a subject, or applies different theories in particular cases. It can sometimes seem inelegant or lacking in simplicity, and eclectics are sometimes criticized for lack of consistency in their thinking. It is, however, common in many fields of study. For example, most psychologists accept certain aspects of behaviorism, but do not attempt to use the theory to explain all aspects of human behavior. A statistician may use frequentist techniques on one occasion and Bayesian ones on another.

Read more about Eclecticism:  Origin, Architecture and Art, Psychology, Martial Arts, In Philology, Philosophy, Religion

Other articles related to "eclecticism":

Eclecticism In Architecture - History - The Shift Away From Eclecticism
... Enthusiasm for historical imitation began to decline in the 1930s and eclecticism was phased out in the curriculums of design schools, in favour of a new style ... Despite the move away from eclecticism, the era still remains historically significant as it “re-opened the doors to innovation and new forms” for architecture in the following years ...
Michel Legrand - Eclecticism
... Legrand has also recorded classical piano pieces by Erik Satie and American composers such as Amy Beach, George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, John Cage, and Conlon Nancarrow ... He is a prolific recorder of jazz, popular and classical music albums, have released over one hundred ...
Spanish Architecture - 19th Century - Eclecticism and Regionalism
... style made of the mixture of several old styles in the same construction the Eclecticism ... Industrial iron architecture and Eclecticism, as very often architects took some features of several of them for their works ...
Hellenistic Philosophy - Hellenistic Schools of Thought - Eclecticism
... Eclecticism was a system of philosophy which adopted no single set of doctrines but selected from existing philosophical beliefs those doctrines that seemed most reasonable ...