Early Life of Marilyn Monroe

Early Life Of Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe was born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926, in the charity ward of the Los Angeles County Hospital. According to biographer Fred Lawrence Guiles, her grandmother, Della Monroe Grainger, had her baptised Norma Jeane Baker by Aimee Semple McPherson. She obtained an order from the City Court of the State of New York and legally changed her name to Marilyn Monroe on February 23, 1956.

Read more about Early Life Of Marilyn MonroeHer Mother, Her Father, Foster Parents

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