Ear Trained Musicians How This Relates To Learning An Instrument

Famous quotes containing the words learning, relates, instrument, trained, ear and/or musicians:

    Nature will not let us fret and fume. She does not like our benevolence or our learning much better than she likes our frauds and wars. When we come out of the caucus, or the bank, or the abolition-convention, or the temperance-meeting, or the transcendental club, into the fields and woods, she says to us, “so hot? my little Sir.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
    Jane Austen (1775–1817)

    People of talent resemble a musical instrument more closely than they do a musician. Without outside help, they produce not a single sound, but given even the slightest touch, and a magnificent tune emanates from them.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)

    The problem is simply this: no one can feel like CEO of his or her life in the presence of the people who toilet trained her and spanked him when he was naughty. We may have become Masters of the Universe, accustomed to giving life and taking it away, casually ordering people into battle or out of their jobs . . . and yet we may still dirty our diapers at the sound of our mommy’s whimper or our daddy’s growl.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)

    And what is so rare as a day in June?
    Then, if ever, come perfect days;
    Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune,
    And over it softly her warm ear lays:
    Whether we look, or whether we listen,
    We hear life murmur, or see it glisten;
    James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)

    We stand in the tumult of a festival.
    What festival? This loud, disordered mooch?
    These hospitaliers? These brute-like guests?
    These musicians dubbing at a tragedy,
    A-dub, a-dub, which is made up of this:
    That there are no lines to speak? There is no play.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)