Duke of Edinburgh

The title Duke of Edinburgh, named after the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, has been created four times for members of the British royal family since 1726. The current holder is Prince Philip, consort to Queen Elizabeth II.

Read more about Duke Of Edinburgh:  History of The Title, Dukes of Edinburgh, First Creation (1726–1760), Dukes of Gloucester and Edinburgh, Second Creation (1764–1834), Dukes of Edinburgh, Third Creation (1866–1900), Dukes of Edinburgh, Fourth Creation (1947–present)

Other articles related to "duke of edinburgh, duke":

St Aloysius College, Adelaide - Extracurricular Activities - Duke of Edinburgh
... The Duke of Edinburgh program is available for students from year 8 onwards, with hundreds of students having an involvement in the program ... See Duke of Edinburgh Award ...
Duke Of Edinburgh - Dukes of Edinburgh, Fourth Creation (1947–present) - Future Dukes
... Edward, Earl of Wessex that he would follow his father as Duke of Edinburgh ... Prince Edward after it "eventually reverts to the crown" after "both the death of the current Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales' succession as King." ...
Field Marshal (Australia) - Duke of Edinburgh, 1954
... Australian field marshal is HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who was promoted to the rank of field marshal in the Australian Army on 1 April 1954—over a year after he attained ... However, as consort of Queen Elizabeth II, the duke's rank is purely ceremonial—he has no command or control role in the Australian Defence Force (ADF), and ...

Famous quotes containing the words duke of and/or duke:

    When the Prince of Wales [later King George IV] and the Duke of York went to visit their brother Prince William [later William IV] at Plymouth, and all three being very loose in their manners, and coarse in their language, Prince William said to his ship’s crew, “now I hope you see that I am not the greatest blackguard of my family.”
    Horace Walpole (1717–1797)

    When the Prince of Wales [later King George IV] and the Duke of York went to visit their brother Prince William [later William IV] at Plymouth, and all three being very loose in their manners, and coarse in their language, Prince William said to his ship’s crew, “now I hope you see that I am not the greatest blackguard of my family.”
    Horace Walpole (1717–1797)