Drug of Choice

Drug of Choice is a novel written by Michael Crichton under the pseudonym John Lange. It was originally published in 1970.

Works by Michael Crichton
Novels
  • The Andromeda Strain (1969)
  • The Terminal Man (1972)
  • The Great Train Robbery (1975)
  • Eaters of the Dead (1976)
  • Congo (1980)
  • Sphere (1987)
  • Jurassic Park (1990)
  • Rising Sun (1992)
  • Disclosure (1994)
  • The Lost World (1995)
  • Airframe (1996)
  • Timeline (1999)
  • Prey (2002)
  • State of Fear (2004)
  • Next (2006)
  • Pirate Latitudes (2009)
  • Micro (2011, with Richard Preston)
Novels written
under pseudonyms
  • Odds On (1966)
  • Scratch One (1967)
  • Easy Go (1968)
  • A Case of Need (1968)
  • Zero Cool (1969)
  • The Venom Business (1969)
  • Drug of Choice (1970)
  • Dealing (1970)
  • Grave Descend (1970)
  • Binary (1972)
Non-fiction
  • Five Patients (1970)
  • Jasper Johns (1977)
  • Electronic Life (1983)
  • Travels (1988)
Film
adaptations
  • The Andromeda Strain (1971)
  • Dealing: Or the Berkeley-to-Boston Forty-Brick Lost-Bag Blues (1972)
  • The Carey Treatment (1972)
  • The Terminal Man (1974)
  • The First Great Train Robbery (1979)
  • Rising Sun (1993)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Disclosure (1994)
  • Congo (1995)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Sphere (1998)
  • The 13th Warrior (1999)
  • Timeline (2003)
  • The Andromeda Strain (2008)
Film writer
or director
  • Pursuit (1972)
  • Westworld (1973)
  • Coma (1978)
  • The First Great Train Robbery (1979)
  • Looker (1981)
  • Runaway (1984)
  • Physical Evidence (1989)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Rising Sun (1993)
  • Twister (1996)
TV series
  • Beyond Westworld (1980)
  • ER (1994–2009)


Famous quotes containing the words choice and/or drug:

    We hold our hate too choice a thing
    For light and careless lavishing.
    Sir William Watson (1858–1936)

    Most people aren’t appreciated enough, and the bravest things we do in our lives are usually known only to ourselves. No one throws ticker tape on the man who chose to be faithful to his wife, on the lawyer who didn’t take the drug money, or the daughter who held her tongue again and again. All this anonymous heroism.
    Peggy Noonan (b. 1950)