Drainage Gradient

Drainage gradient (DG) is a term in road technology, defining the resulting vector of a road surface cross slope (CS) and longitudinal gradient (hilliness).

If the DG is too low, rain and melt water drainage will be insufficient. This results in water pooling on the road surface, thereby increasing the risk for hydroplaning (tires) and vehicle crash.

Read more about Drainage Gradient:  Most Road Design Codes Require Minimum 0.5 % Drainage Gradient, Drainage Gradient Typically Exceeds 1 - 3 %, Short Sections Have Insufficient DG But Are Vehicle Crash Hot Spots, How To Avoid or Minimize Skid Risk Caused By Insufficient Drainage Gradient

Other articles related to "drainage gradient, gradients, drainage":

How To Avoid or Minimize Skid Risk Caused By Insufficient Drainage Gradient
... Otherwise the pavement will get an area with too little drainage gradient (< 0.5%), resulting in unacceptable skid accident risk ... These "synthetic" longitudinal gradients can then be used to reach a sufficient drainage gradient, in sections where the cross slope is close to zero ...
Aquaplaning - Causes - Water Depth Factors
... a particular point, which affects both drainage and the weight of the vehicle ... resultant of cross slope and grade is called drainage gradient or "resulting grade" ... Most road design manuals world wide require that the drainage gradient in all road sections must exceed 0.5%, in order to avoid a thick water film ...