Dot Cotton

Some articles on dot, dot cotton, cotton:

June Brown - Film and Television Career - EastEnders and Dot
... was recommended to producers for the role of Dot by another one of its original cast members, Leslie Grantham, who played the show's villain, Den Watts ... Dot Cotton is one of the longest-running characters in EastEnders ... Dot Cotton was originally brought on for a short-term story arc to complement the storyline of her screen son, Nick Cotton, being accused of murder ...
East Enders In Popular Culture - Other
... The monthly Dot Cotton Club, a gay club night in Cambridge, is named after the character of Dot Branning, who was previously named Dot Cotton ... Dot is probably the most notable smoker on British television as she rarely appears on-screen without a cigarette ... The character is so synonymous with smoking that the term "Dot Cotton syndrome" is used within the health industry to "describe the elderly population who ...
List Of East Enders Characters (1985) - Dot Cotton
... Dorothy "Dot" Branning (née Colwell previously Cotton), played by June Brown, is the mother of original character Nick Cotton (John Altman) ... In a special episode entitled EastEnders Dot's Story (2003) a young Dot is played by Tallulah Pitt-Brown in flashbacks ... Dot first appears in EastEnders in July 1985, and has worked as a launderette assistant for most of that time along with original character Pauline Fowler (Wendy Richard) ...
List Of East Enders Television Spin-offs - Documentary Shows - EastEnders Revealed - List of Titled Episodes
... Sharon Watts Revealed" Sharon Watts July 2001 (2001-07) "Dot to Dot" Dot Cotton 20 August 2001 (2001-08-20) "Slaters Revealed" Slater family 10 October 2001 (2001-10-10) "Truemans Revealed ... Mitchell - Happy Ever After?" Sam Mitchell 16 September 2004 (2004-09-16) "The One and Only Dot Cotton" Dot Cotton 30 September 2004 (2004-09-30) "Andy Hunter - Hunter's Prey" Andy Hunter 9 December 2004 (2004-12-09) "L ...

Famous quotes containing the word cotton:

    The white American man makes the white American woman maybe not superfluous but just a little kind of decoration. Not really important to turning around the wheels of the state. Well the black American woman has never been able to feel that way. No black American man at any time in our history in the United States has been able to feel that he didn’t need that black woman right against him, shoulder to shoulder—in that cotton field, on the auction block, in the ghetto, wherever.
    Maya Angelou (b. 1928)