Dominion

Dominion

Dominions were autonomous polities that were nominally under British sovereignty, constituting the British Empire and British Commonwealth, beginning in the latter part of the 19th century. They have included (at varying times) Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Newfoundland, the Union of South Africa, and the Irish Free State. Over the decades after 1930, the British dominions each became independent of the United Kingdom. Those that became sovereign constitutional monarchies within the Commonwealth of Nations and maintained as their own the same royal house and royal succession from before independence became known as Commonwealth realms; others soon became republics, ending their status as dominions.

The term "dominion" was also used in the names of certain Commonwealth realms; these included (at varying times) India, Pakistan, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Kenya, and others.

Read more about Dominion:  Definition, Southern Rhodesia, Foreign Relations, From Dominions To Commonwealth Realms

Other articles related to "dominion":

Dominion, Nova Scotia - History
... In the eighteenth century, Dominion was part of a larger area called L’Indienne (Anglicized to “Lingan”) ... When the Town of Dominion was incorporated in 1906, the area became known officially as Dominion and unofficially as Old Bridgeport Bridgeport was reduced to a small border section between the towns of ... Mining Association opened a colliery at Dominion ...

Famous quotes containing the word dominion:

    Great is the hand that holds dominion over
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    An immoderate fondness for dress, for pleasure, and for sway, are the passions of savages; the passions that occupy those uncivilized beings who have not yet extended the dominion of the mind, or even learned to think with the energy necessary to concatenate that abstract train of thought which produces principles.... that women from their education and the present state of civilized life, are in the same condition, cannot ... be controverted.
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