Doctrine - Legal Usage

Legal Usage

A legal doctrine is a body of inter-related rules (usually of common law and built over a long period of time) associated with a legal concept or principle. For example the doctrine of frustration of purpose now has many tests and rules applicable with regards to each other and can be contained within a "bubble" of frustration. In a court session a defendant may refer to the doctrine of justification.

It can be seen that a branch of law contains various doctrines, which in turn contain various rules or tests. The test of non-occurrence of crucial event is part of the doctrine of frustration which is part of contract law. Doctrines can grow into a branch of law; restitution is now considered a branch of law separate to contract and tort.

Read more about this topic:  Doctrine

Other articles related to "legal usage, legal":

Kashrut - Supervision and Marketing - Legal Usage
... product conforms to Jewish dietary laws however, the legal qualifications for conforming to Jewish dietary laws are often defined differently in different jurisdictions ...
Sacramentum (oath) - Legal Usage
... legis actio was a sum of money deposited in a legal procedure to affirm that both parties to the litigation were acting in good faith ...

Famous quotes containing the words usage and/or legal:

    Girls who put out are tramps. Girls who don’t are ladies. This is, however, a rather archaic usage of the word. Should one of you boys happen upon a girl who doesn’t put out, do not jump to the conclusion that you have found a lady. What you have probably found is a lesbian.
    Fran Lebowitz (b. 1951)

    ... whilst you are proclaiming peace and good will to men, Emancipating all Nations, you insist upon retaining absolute power over wives. But you must remember that Arbitrary power is like most other things which are very hard, very liable to be broken—and notwithstanding all your wise Laws and Maxims we have it in our power not only to free ourselves but to subdue our Masters, and without violence throw both your natural and legal authority at our feet ...
    Abigail Adams (1744–1818)