DNA Computing

DNA computing is a form of computing which uses DNA, biochemistry and molecular biology, instead of the traditional silicon-based computer technologies. DNA computing, or, more generally, biomolecular computing, is a fast developing interdisciplinary area. Research and development in this area concerns theory, experiments, and applications of DNA computing.

Read more about DNA Computing:  History, Capabilities, Methods

Other articles related to "dna computing, computing, dna":

Timeline Of United States Inventions (after 1991) - Contemporary Era (1992–present) - Post–Cold War and The Mid-to-late 1990s (1992–1999)
1994 DNA computing DNA computing is a form of computing which uses DNA, biochemistry and molecular biology, instead of the traditional silicon-based computer technologies ... DNA computing, or, more generally, molecular computing, is a fast developing interdisciplinary area ... in this area concerns theory, experiments and applications of DNA computing ...
DNA Computing - Methods - Algorithmic Self-assembly
... DNA nanotechnology has been applied to the related field of DNA computing ... DNA tiles can be designed to contain multiple sticky ends with sequences chosen so that they act as Wang tiles ... whose assembly encodes an XOR operation this allows the DNA array to implement a cellular automaton which generates a fractal called the Sierpinski gasket ...
Lateral Computing - A Review of Lateral-computing Techniques - DNA Computing
... DNA computing uses strands of DNA to encode the instance of the problem and to manipulate them using techniques commonly available in any molecular biology ... These computers rely on the much faster reactions of DNA nucleotides binding with their complements, a brute force method that holds enormous potential for creating a new ... DNA computing has been heralded as the "first example of true nanotechnology", and even the "start of a new era", which forges an unprecedented link ...

Famous quotes containing the word dna:

    Here [in London, history] ... seemed the very fabric of things, as if the city were a single growth of stone and brick, uncounted strata of message and meaning, age upon age, generated over the centuries to the dictates of some now all-but-unreadable DNA of commerce and empire.
    William Gibson (b. 1948)