Distinction may refer to:

  • Two, or more, things being distinct from one another

Other articles related to "distinction":

Love Is Hell (Kitchens Of Distinction Album)
... rock/dream pop group Kitchens of Distinction, first released in April 1989 by One Little Indian Records in the UK and A M Records in the US ... from Patrick Fitzgerald gave Kitchens of Distinction their own signature sound ...
Scholarship Level
... Results were graded 'Distinction' (1), 'Merit' (2) or 'Unclassified' (U) ... The S level Higher Maths papers were not marked unless at least 75(Distinction) was secured in the A level Pure and/or Applied mathematics papers. 3 questions of the 10 was stated by the examiners on the paper to be sufficient to secure a distinction (75) ...
Madhyamākalaṃkāra - Five Assertions - Fifth Assertion
... In part, he does this by noting that a clear distinction can be made when one is analyzing for each case, including the use of two different approaches of valid cognition ... closer to the ultimate view, pointing out that the distinction between Prasangika and Svatantrika is really one of how one talks to students about conventionalities and not really a ... Further Mipham concludes that Je Tsongkhapa by making a distinction of true establishment is also proposing a Svatantrika approach instead of a truly Prasangika approach ...
Chaung-U - Distinction
... Another distinction of the town is of having the most aging festival of Maha Pawah Rāna of the whole township on Thidingyut Full Moon Day every year ...

Famous quotes containing the word distinction:

    No one can doubt, that the convention for the distinction of property, and for the stability of possession, is of all circumstances the most necessary to the establishment of human society, and that after the agreement for the fixing and observing of this rule, there remains little or nothing to be done towards settling a perfect harmony and concord.
    David Hume (1711–1776)

    Only where there is pecuniary equality can the distinction of merit stand out.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    Let those talk of poverty and hard times who will in the towns and cities; cannot the emigrant who can pay his fare to New York or Boston pay five dollars more to get here ... and be as rich as he pleases, where land virtually costs nothing, and houses only the labor of building, and he may begin life as Adam did? If he will still remember the distinction of poor and rich, let him bespeak him a narrower house forthwith.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)