Dictionary of Algorithms and Data Structures

The Dictionary of Algorithms and Data Structures is a dictionary style reference for many of the algorithms, algorithmic techniques, archetypal problems and data structures found in the field of computer science. The dictionary is maintained by Paul E. Black, and is hosted by the Software and Systems Division, Information Technology Laboratory, a part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. It was created in September 1998.

Famous quotes containing the words dictionary of, structures, data and/or dictionary:

    If someday I make a dictionary of definitions wanting single words to head them, a cherished entry will be “To abridge, expand, or otherwise alter or cause to be altered for the sake of belated improvement, one’s own writings in translation.”
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    The philosopher believes that the value of his philosophy lies in its totality, in its structure: posterity discovers it in the stones with which he built and with which other structures are subsequently built that are frequently better—and so, in the fact that that structure can be demolished and yet still possess value as material.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    To write it, it took three months; to conceive it three minutes; to collect the data in it—all my life.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    The much vaunted male logic isn’t logical, because they display prejudices—against half the human race—that are considered prejudices according to any dictionary definition.
    Eva Figes (b. 1932)