Design and Architecture High School - Curriculum

Curriculum

The school features programs in Architecture/Interior Design, Entertainment Technology, Fashion Design, Industrial Design, and Visual Communications/Web Design. The curriculum includes a strong, four-year foundation in the fine arts, internships with local design firms, and dual-enrollment college-level design courses, such as performance art, taught by professors from local colleges as well as field professionals. Students take 8 courses a year (4 core classes, 2-3 art classes, and 1-2 electives) as opposed to the regular 6-course curriculum in most other Florida high schools.

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Famous quotes containing the word curriculum:

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