Deputy Director of The Central Intelligence Agency

Deputy Director Of The Central Intelligence Agency

The Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (DD/CIA) is a senior United States government official in the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. The DD/CIA assists the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA) and is authorized to exercise the powers of the D/CIA when the Director's position is vacant or in the Director's absence or disability.

The functions of this position were served by the Deputy Director of Central Intelligence (DDCI) until that position was abolished under the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004. The position of DD/CIA was created administratively by then-D/CIA Porter Goss and is awaiting statutory approval from the U.S. Congress.

The first DDCI was Kingman Douglass, appointed by the Director of Central Intelligence (now the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency) in 1946. In April 1953, Congress amended the National Security Act of 1947 to allow the President of the United States to appoint the DDCI (with U.S. Senate confirmation). The amendment stipulated that the Director and Deputy Director positions could not be simultaneously filled by military officers.

Under current law, the Deputy Director is appointed by the D/CIA and is not required to be confirmed by the United States Senate. Following David Petraeus' resignation, there is no current Deputy Director.

Read more about Deputy Director Of The Central Intelligence Agency:  List of Deputy Directors of Central Intelligence, List of Deputy Directors of The Central Intelligence Agency

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